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 Post subject: Turn Apart: a very rare and unique puzzle
PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 5:26 pm 
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Location: Marin, CA
I'd like to draw everyone's attention to Turn Apart. This puzzle hasn't gotten much attention, partially because it isn't actively advertised, but also because the very interesting nature of the puzzle isn't obvious from the pictures.

Turn Apart is a take-apart puzzle, in that it starts with assembled pieces which must be separated to solve the puzzle (or vice versa). The movement, very surprisingly for a take apart puzzle, is similar to that of a 2x2x2. The internal mechanism is sort of like a rubik-style 2x2x2 mechanism with some of the hidden edges missing and others glued to corners (although you can't make this puzzle by literally gluing that mechanism because the pieces aren't 'grippy' enough.)

Many movements are blocked and the puzzle has to be treated essentially like a maze, classifying it on the boundary between higher dimensional mazes and bandaged twisty puzzles. After several correct turns are done the piece which has all female edges can be removed, and the others follow.

(Posted at the request of the inventor, although I'm vouching for the puzzle myself and wrote the above.)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 5:33 pm 
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Meh. And $375 dollars, eh?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 7:08 pm 
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sirajali05 wrote:
Meh. And $375 dollars, eh?


BTW: That price comes from the puzzle's expensive fabrication process. The puzzle builder, George Miller, isn't gouging his buyers.

Many of his puzzles are hand made, and their prices reflect the cost of materials. His Three Card Burr for example is only $5. (I own that one, but haven't built up the courage to assemble it!) :P

I haven't tried Turn Apart, but I'm intrigued by Bram's nice, tangible description of it. Are there any more pictures of it?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 7:27 am 
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Location: Marske-By-The-Sea, UK
that is 3d printed that puzzle, hence the price.

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Speedcubing tutorial

@.=split(//,"J huhesartc kPaeenrro,lt");do{print$.[$_];$_=($_+3)%25;}while($_!=0);


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 7:57 am 
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Location: Greece, Australia, Thailand, India, Singapore.
Thank you Bram for reminding me of this puzzle! :)

I was fortunate to try out this puzzle three weeks ago. I didn't spent too much time with it, but my impressions were excellent.

It's at the bottom of the photo.


It is indeed pricey, but in my opinion, worth its value.


Instead, I got the brilliant "Rotten Apple" that George Miller is holding (invented by Oskar), and I have really enjoyed playing with it.

Another puzzle that I would love to get (probably in the future?) is the Moby Maze. Simply beautiful!

:)


Pantazis



Edit: Link fixed! (thanks guys!)

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Last edited by kastellorizo on Sat Sep 08, 2007 12:39 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 9:06 am 
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Check your links Panda.

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List of Speedcubing methods
Speedcubing tutorial

@.=split(//,"J huhesartc kPaeenrro,lt");do{print$.[$_];$_=($_+3)%25;}while($_!=0);


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 9:15 am 
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Location: Princeton, NJ
Did you mean the Mango Maze??
http://www.puzzlepalace.com/index.php?l ... d%3D200210
cus that looks amazing..

*Edit*
i found the moby maze,
http://www.puzzlepalace.com/viewPuzzle.php?id=200405
an awesome mobius strip puzzle!!


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 Post subject: Moby Maze for sale
PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 10:40 am 
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Location: SF Bay Area
The Moby Maze was my Exchange Puzzle at last year's IPP. This version was made of 3D printed nylon, which is somewhat a less-expensive material/process compared to George Miller's.

I have one "large" (2 1/2") version still for sale, for $100. Please contact me if interested.

Rotten Apple (the puzzle that George Miller is holding in the photo above) is my Exchange Puzzle from this year, and is also available in green and red for $25.


Attachments:
File comment: Large Moby Maze
MobyLarge2.JPG
MobyLarge2.JPG [ 5.46 KiB | Viewed 3458 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Moby Maze for sale
PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 12:14 pm 
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Nick Baxter wrote:
The Moby Maze was my Exchange Puzzle at last year's IPP. This version was made of 3D printed nylon, which is somewhat a less-expensive material/process compared to George Miller's.


Just curious, is that Selective Laser-Sintered nylon? I've only handled one SLS sample (Free Willy) and its open, grainy texture made it seem fragile. Is that just a subjective misinterpretation? Is 3D printed nylon stronger than it 'feels'?

On the original topic:

Bram's comments convinced me to buy a Turn Apart soon. Have any other board users decided to buy it, or any of the other puzzles at Puzzle Palace? It'd would be interesting to know if TwistyPuzzles users are about to bombard George Miller with puzzle orders! (That's probably too much to hope for.)

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 Post subject: Re: Moby Maze for sale
PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 12:46 pm 
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VeryWetPaint wrote:
Nick Baxter wrote:
The Moby Maze was my Exchange Puzzle at last year's IPP. This version was made of 3D printed nylon, which is somewhat a less-expensive material/process compared to George Miller's.


Just curious, is that Selective Laser-Sintered nylon? I've only handled one SLS sample (Free Willy) and its open, grainy texture made it seem fragile. Is that just a subjective misinterpretation? Is 3D printed nylon stronger than it 'feels'?

Yes, it is the same material as Free Willy. The grain is due to the laying process. Depending on thickness and direction of grain, objects like Free Willy can break, but also have some flexibility and are not as fragile as they might look. I actually did a couple tests with the Free Willy cage a while ago: dropping on a hard floor was not a problem; and it took unusual force to break by hand. The large Moby Maze is twice the size, and has virtually no risk of breakage.


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 Post subject: Re: Moby Maze for sale
PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2007 12:31 am 
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Nick Baxter wrote:
The Moby Maze was my Exchange Puzzle at last year's IPP. This version was made of 3D printed nylon, which is somewhat a less-expensive material/process compared to George Miller's.

I have one "large" (2 1/2") version still for sale, for $100. Please contact me if interested.


I am!!! :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops:
(I hope I am not too late!)




Nick Baxter wrote:
Rotten Apple (the puzzle that George Miller is holding in the photo above) is my Exchange Puzzle from this year, and is also available in green and red for $25.


Indeed!




It is a very nice puzzle, and the concept of using a helix (instead of the traditional slightly opened ring) which can turn in 120 degree (hexagonal based) directions is a genius one. I would say one of the top 5 puzzles out of the 80 I got from the IPP!



Pantazis

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 12:52 am 
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Location: Oregon, USA
Thanks Bram for endorsing Turn Apart!

I just tried it for the first time. Since there were no photos of Turn Apart on the thread I decided to post some here.

I've made an effort to avoid any spoilers! :wink:


Attachments:
File comment: In the "solved" state, the ridges on all pieces are aligned with each other. The puzzle turns freely, all the way around, in parallel with the ridges.
IMG_0840.JPG
IMG_0840.JPG [ 19.5 KiB | Viewed 2973 times ]
File comment: Scrambled, but still assembled. The raised ridge runs in random directions.
IMG_0857.JPG
IMG_0857.JPG [ 19.2 KiB | Viewed 2974 times ]
File comment: Fully disassembled. The pieces have tongues and grooves, which hold the puzzle together and sometimes block turns.

Now for the hard part: how do I put it back together??

IMG_0858.JPG
IMG_0858.JPG [ 20.59 KiB | Viewed 2976 times ]
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2007 12:36 pm 
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Location: Oregon, USA
There are so few pictures of this remarkable puzzle that it warrants a couple of better-quality pictures to explain how the mechanism works.

I tried to avoid spoilers in these shots, but please contact me if you think I've given anything away. (Other than the necessary basics of the puzzle.)

As Bram said previously, it behaves a lot like a 2x2x2 cube but with some moves blocked if two tongues meet. Typical of Oskar's puzzle designs there are a lot of unexpected Aha! insights during re-assembly. Alan Turing would be proud!


Attachments:
File comment: Four pieces, arbitrarily arranged so they could each attach to two neighbors.
IMG_0869.JPG
IMG_0869.JPG [ 26.39 KiB | Viewed 2883 times ]
File comment: Pieces attached, showing how the tongues ride in the grooves.
IMG_0870.JPG
IMG_0870.JPG [ 27.39 KiB | Viewed 2882 times ]
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 12:39 am 
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Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2005 12:31 am
Location: Greece, Australia, Thailand, India, Singapore.
I have now received the Moby Maze and it is such a great puzzle in many ways. Categorising this puzzle is not easy, as its unique nature deserves to belong into a new category. It is not a simple maze, as it contains the mathematical mobius strip concept, and to solve it, you must twist the red piece around its one... side! It is something like a "twist-o-mathematical labyrinth".

I didn't have much time to try it out thoroughly, but it does not seem a difficult puzzle if you have already worked out in your mind the possible routes/paths. But playing with it is surely rewarding, and it makes you feel like those ants in Mr Escher's drawings!

Many thanks to Nick Baxter for the thumbs up and for letting me know of the availability of this masterpiece. I was eyeing this puzzle for four entire years already!!!

:oops: :oops: :oops:


Pantazis

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