Online since 2002. Over 3300 puzzles, 2600 worldwide members, and 270,000 messages.

TwistyPuzzles.com Forum

It is currently Tue Jul 22, 2014 7:36 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 11:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2012 10:51 pm
In some semi-random googling for my other hobby (r/c helicopters). I came across this:

http://www.reprap.org/wiki/Main_Page

Has anyone used one of these to make their own parts for puzzles?

Yes, I know this is my first post, and a bit out-of-left-field, but it is the first place that I felt I could contribute something. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 11:51 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 10, 2009 7:06 pm
Location: Nowhere in particular.
RepRap has been around for quite a while now. While I don't personally own one/have experience with it, I've probably seen around 10 of them or so and I can tell you that the print quality does differ drastically. I'd assume this is due to higher quality parts/better configurations from the builder of the printer. It's great for a hobbyist who loves fine tuning and tinkering, but not quite as good for less experienced users.

Basically the print quality I've seen varied from big blobs of plastic to about the same quality as a Makerbot Thing-O-Matic. So, while it could in theory be used for simple puzzle parts, the owner needs to be pretty dedicated to reach that goal.

_________________
~Kapusta

PB: At home (In Competition)
2x2 1.xx (2.88)
3x3 11.xx (15.81)
4x4 1:18.26 (1:24.63)
5x5 (3:00.02)
6x6 4:26.05 (6:34.68)
7x7 6:38.74 (9:48.81)
OH (35.63)

Current Goals:
7x7 sub 6:30
4x4 sub 1:10


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2013 10:12 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2011 2:07 pm
Location: Incheon, South Korea
I've seen lots of video with RepRaps on Youtube.

And my conclusion is, When you want to make it to print the puzzles, the printer have to be more more elaborate and more more accurate than other regular ones.

RepRap makes the pieces out of thin thread of hot plastic as you already realized, so the surface of the result is always so hard that it can cause uncomfortable turning and noise when it's assembled and you're playing it.

The thicker the thread be, The hard the surface be. Sometimes it even makes the puzzle doesn't work.

In average the thread is not thin enough to make a playable puzzle.

So if you want to get a satisfactory result, You should make a printer that uses even thinner thread or use some another high-quality printers or Shapeways or something.

_________________
Only the truth will lead me to the right way.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 1:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 10:01 am
How is this? Is it good enough for printing puzzles?

_________________
My YouTube, including a FF Siamese 2x2x2 Walkthrough


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 5:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:17 am
Location: Missourica
I'm still finishing my printer. I've put about $600 into it, and I plan to try to print some puzzles soon.

I'll see if I can get up pics of my current print quality; it's about good enough to print something like maybe a 5x5x5 vcube but currently thats about my limit. It's getting better quality ever week.

The replicator 2 will print puzzles well if you print on the finest, slowest settings with a tiny nozzle. And if you have the cash for one :p

_________________
Adam Brown, Puzzle Builder/Modder

Past project: The Geode
Current Project: Replica RPK-74
Future Project: Possibly another master mental
Oskar wrote:
I am now adding dummy cubes to my models to cross the 10% density threshold and save myself money big time.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 5:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:33 am
Location: Hiram, Ohio
What about the Fabbster? Does anyone know anything about that?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 5:32 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:17 am
Location: Missourica
Eh, they're OK. I personally would go with either Makerbot if you have the money or reprap to build it yourself. Richrap, my favorite reprapper, wrote the following blog entry a while ago I remembered:

Quote:
Fabbster have a Closed source printer (Sintermask) that operates in a similar to most RepRaps, it has no heated bed at the moment and uses Rafts for prints. Quality is reasonable.


They have a patented stick deposit system, this is basically Injection moulded plastic sticks of material that are loaded into a magazine and snap together as they exit into a PTFE tube onto it's way to the extruder.
They have many materials including a flexible (soft PLA style) that was very nice to handle.

The machine is big and well built. They were very nice at the show and passionate about people using their printers and materials. They passed the Maker test and we chatted for some time about the machine.

_________________
Adam Brown, Puzzle Builder/Modder

Past project: The Geode
Current Project: Replica RPK-74
Future Project: Possibly another master mental
Oskar wrote:
I am now adding dummy cubes to my models to cross the 10% density threshold and save myself money big time.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:33 am
Location: Hiram, Ohio
It's just hard because this is one subject I'm definitely not confident on. I would love a 3d printer and haveused cad type programs in the past but I feel like I could never build a reprap! Haha


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:33 am
Location: Hiram, Ohio
I have another question!
I am beginning to be quite interested in this 3d printer
http://printrbot.com/shop/printrbot-lc/

Has anyone heard anything about it? Does anyone know if it would be good for puzzles?

It seems to be along with the whole reprap thing as well..


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:02 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2008 2:39 pm
Location: Marquette, MI, USA
maybe not quite the same thing, but
this might interest you.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:33 am
Location: Hiram, Ohio
I saw that! It's hilarious! And really interesting, it is a real shame us cubers couldn't do much with it though.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:55 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 12:46 pm
Location: Wichita
I have a rep rap printer and its probably good enough quality to print puzzles but there's a few reasons why its really difficult. Since it uses melted plastic its really pest to print one part at a time to prevent strands from one part to another. Also it has no support material so it is limited by that as well.

_________________
Feel free to visit my Shapeways Shop!
Pentaminx Auction


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 12:01 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2009 8:54 pm
Location: Bay Area, California
Being "good for puzzles" really falls into two broad categories: being good for some twisty puzzles, and being good for twisty puzzles in general.

Almost every DIY 3D printer out there uses the FDM process where a thermoplastic is injected through a hot nozzle and leaves a thin bead of plastic.

As it stands today, the FDM process does not treat each dimension (X, Y, and Z) equally. They are often much more accurate in 1 or 2 dimensions but not the 3rd.

Claus has demonstrated quite convincingly that a 3D printer can be used for some puzzles. Most of Claus's 3D-printed puzzles are based on a Skewb mechanism which is as simple as mechanisms get.

Nobody will ever print a Big Chop on an FDM-based 3D printer.

Shapeways WSF is accurate to about .1mm in all three dimensions. Unless you have a 3D printer with similar precision it "isn't good for puzzles".

_________________
Prior to using my real name I posted under the account named bmenrigh.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Small Personal 3D Printers.
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 7:03 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:33 am
Location: Hiram, Ohio
cubedude76 wrote:
I have a rep rap printer and its probably good enough quality to print puzzles but there's a few reasons why its really difficult. Since it uses melted plastic its really pest to print one part at a time to prevent strands from one part to another. Also it has no support material so it is limited by that as well.


Wouldn't the strands be easily broken off? Or cut off?

And what exactly do you mean by support material? Wouldn't the pieces still be rigid due to the crosshatching of plastic inside of them?

bmenrigh wrote:
Being "good for puzzles" really falls into two broad categories: being good for some twisty puzzles, and being good for twisty puzzles in general.

Almost every DIY 3D printer out there uses the FDM process where a thermoplastic is injected through a hot nozzle and leaves a thin bead of plastic.

As it stands today, the FDM process does not treat each dimension (X, Y, and Z) equally. They are often much more accurate in 1 or 2 dimensions but not the 3rd.

Claus has demonstrated quite convincingly that a 3D printer can be used for some puzzles. Most of Claus's 3D-printed puzzles are based on a Skewb mechanism which is as simple as mechanisms get.

Nobody will ever print a Big Chop on an FDM-based 3D printer.

Shapeways WSF is accurate to about .1mm in all three dimensions. Unless you have a 3D printer with similar precision it "isn't good for puzzles".


Thank you for clearing a few things up! You and your videos are so helpful.

Thank you so much for the responses guys,

Here's another general question .....
I'm assuming ABS is a much preferred material, but how does PLA fair in terms of puzzles/extensions/what-have-you?


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Forum powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group