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 Post subject: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 4:26 pm 
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(From the 17x17x17 topic)
TomZ wrote:
This post doesn't have anything to do with the original topic, so if anybody wants to comment on household 3D printers, please do so in a new topic.

...so I did. Feel free to discuss 3d printers in this topic.

TomZ wrote:
A better choice might be the V-Flash (also around that price) which looks really promising to me but has never been tried for puzzles (I want to see if I can get a sample made some day).

While it looks promising, I have read that the printed parts from a V-Flash are not very strong, and therefore may not be good for puzzles. I probably shouldn't judge it until I have a sample, though.

Another thing to keep an eye on is the BFB 3000. (see here for more technical specifications) It claims to have fairly good accuracy, and it can have up to three extruder heads, so it can print support material, unlike the RepRap and Makerbot. Bits from Bytes has not yet made a soluble support material for the BFB 3000, but I think it is currently in the works.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 4:52 pm 
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(From the 17x17x17 topic)

TomZ wrote:
Of course there is the <$1k RepRap but that machine won't satisfy any puzzle building needs whatsoever.

There is also the < $1K Cupcake, which also won't satisfy any twisty building needs, at present, but within the year it will have a second print head for support material. The RepRap is also working towards this.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 5:55 pm 
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Even current reprap printers can make pretty good parts using Dave's fill and sand method.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 6:11 pm 
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Beans wrote:
Even current reprap printers can make pretty good parts using Dave's fill and sand method.

And current Makerbot Cupcakes can already handle 45° overhang. With some creative piece subdividing this could suffice for some puzzles. I was sorely temped after watching one in action -- it is just too cool to be able to run off stuff in your own house. But I will wait at least until they have the 2nd print head.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 9:09 pm 
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Thought I'd share a couple of things.

3D printing with... light and chemicals?

Haven't read this article yet, but it seems to be for small scale. Just thought it was cool.

This SLS printer, on the other hand, is a great cheap start.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 2:55 pm 
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Any discussion of "home" 3d printing should mention Additive 3D's page about low-cost 3d printing:

http://www.additive3d.com/comp_lks.htm

They describe all the emerging technologies and models (including the aforementioned ones) and there's a nice comparison chart.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 4:13 pm 
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in my opinion the best 3d printers are SLSs because they can make a piece with holes, while others can not, moreover they are very limited.For example, Makerbot can not make the letter H vertically, because it does not have the support material:
Attachment:
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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 4:32 pm 
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What reason would you make the H vertically instead of lying flat?

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 4:36 pm 
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theVDude wrote:
What reason would you make the H vertically instead of lying flat?
To demonstrate that a lack of support material is a problem.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:37 pm 
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TomZ wrote:
theVDude wrote:
What reason would you make the H vertically instead of lying flat?
To demonstrate that a lack of support material is a problem.
Yes, but a better example would be one that shows a part that cannot be printed at all with a MakerBot, and preferably one that it would be awkward or impossible to subdivide into printable pieces. Is that even possible? In principle anything can be subdivided into pieces that can be printed without support material. One can even add vertical alignment pegs / holes.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 6:34 pm 
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bhearn wrote:
Yes, but a better example would be one that shows a part that cannot be printed at all with a MakerBot, and preferably one that it would be awkward or impossible to subdivide into printable pieces. Is that even possible? In principle anything can be subdivided into pieces that can be printed without support material. One can even add vertical alignment pegs / holes.

Makerbot is a piece of crap (for printing puzzles) the detail level is ridiculous, i think its something about 0.8mm
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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:12 pm 
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mu puzzles wrote:
in my opinion the best 3d printers are SLSs because they can make a piece with holes, while others can not, moreover they are very limited.

mu puzzles wrote:
Makerbot is a piece of crap (for printing puzzles) the detail level is ridiculous, i think its something about 0.8mm

Those pictures prove your point about the Makerbot. It's certainly possible to build a puzzle, as proven by some of the samples here, but the results aren't very elegant.

TheVDude gave an interesting link about someone who's working on a "home" SLS printer here, but it's not finished. It might work better than Makerbot, but that hasn't been demonstrated yet. Do you know of any other "home" SLS technologies? Any links to pictures or projects? (Really!)

For what it's worth, the technology in Desktop Factory was a lot like SLS for the home: it used a focused light source to fuse layers of plastic powder together. But it never made it onto the market.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:36 pm 
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VeryWetPaint wrote:
Those pictures prove your point about the Makerbot.
But what is the scale? I've seen MakerBots run, and the resolution I've seen looks a lot better than that. But without knowing the size of those objects the photo is meaningless. Also, people are experimenting with different nozzle diameters. I doubt anyone is getting resolution as good as Shapeways' SLS on a MakerBot, but whether it can be made good enough is another question. Also, note that FDM can be sanded and smoothed with ABS solvent, which SLS nylon cannot, ultimately resulting in smoother sliding surfaces.

Again, I'm not claiming that MakerBots, currently, are usable for twisty puzzles... but it's not 100% clear to me that they're not.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:49 pm 
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theVDude wrote:
Thought I'd share a couple of things.

3D printing with... light and chemicals?

Haven't read this article yet, but it seems to be for small scale. Just thought it was cool.



That looks really cool, and I actually think it might have a lot of potential for puzzles. It can be pretty precise... this page has some videos explaining the process, but also at the very bottom of the page, there are some pictures that show a bit of what it can do on a small scale. There is a picture there for example of a model of the Lincoln Memorial sitting on a penny, or a pirate ship that is about half the size of a quarter.

My understanding is that with a slightly different setup, it could be scaled up to work better with larger pieces as well, but I think it actually looks like with the exact setup they have it could be scaled up a bit... and even with just the small size that they've shown it is capable of, it should be possible to make some prototypes.

With some basic software and a small motor, you could automate the stage lift they're using so the progression would be entirely automatic and you wouldn't have to stand there and make a quarter turn after every frame like the guy in the video does.

Anyway, I think it's a cool idea and has some potential for puzzles too... wish I had the time and money to mess with this kind of thing right now.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 10:28 pm 
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@bhearn, be careful when editing a quotation--you omitted my second sentence which includes a link that addresses the issue of scale! More pictures at http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2244/copies (be sure to click through to the full size pictures)

Here's one, same size as an ordinary 3x3.


Some users do, indeed, get better resolution from their MakerBots after a lot of tweaking. But some have endless problems.

Makerbot might suffice for building verification models, especially if you scaled them up to a larger size. Not necessarily elegant, but usable with a little ingenuity.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 1:38 am 
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I don't see any potential for a homebrew SLS printer. That blog with the homemade piston system is nice, but SLS is one of the most picky 3D printing processes of them all. SLS needs precise temperature and moisture control or things will go horribly wrong.
Seeing how the DIY community has still not mastered the relatively simple FDM, I doubt that they'll get SLS to work.
Makerbots, RepRaps and ShaperCubes are very nice but they just don't get the nice -results of Stratasys FDM yet. I'll be the first to adopt DIY 3D printing once it yields reasonable results, but from a puzzle building standpoint, it's not even worth looking at them (not that they're not incredibly cool and I'm seriously looking at them).
Also, I wonder why Stratasys still hasn't pursued their countless FDM patents (or are they already expired?). Of course, RepRap as research project is totally legal but there are some shops out there that might be selling patent-infringing products. Oskar told me that they might have waited too long to act (they didn't expect this to grow this big) so now a claim would be invalid. Does anybody know anything about that?

I'm interested in making nice puzzles. FDM allows me to make reasonable puzzles but it requires a week per puzzle smoothing out parts with the garage smelling of solvent. I ditched FDM in favor of SLS and even if RepRaps suddenly start producing parts on par with FDM I doubt I would adopt that technology.

SLS currently is the way to go. It's cheap (remember that would spend the value of getting an entire puzzle printed in SLS to get just the FDM masters?) and parts can be used without much post processing to make a good-turning puzzle. The only downside is that the material does not feel very nice. Liquid resin systems (like SLA, V-Flash, or even DLP [though that seems much to expensive for full prints]) might be the way forward, giving that mass-produced like surface finish. Does anybody have a puzzle that uses actual parts built using such a technology?

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 1:48 am 
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TomZ wrote:
SLS currently is the way to go. ... The only downside is that the material does not feel very nice.

The other downside is the two-week turnaround at ShapeWays.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Jul 21, 2010 7:02 pm 
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I use a 3D printer at home (am I the only one so far?) and I've got a blog about my experiences at http://mysd300.blogspot.com/ so I'll just concentrate on the puzzle-making aspect of household 3d printing.

The SD300 employs a combination of additive and subtractive technologies: for each layer a thin sheet of plastic is added to the top of the model, then a plotter-like knife cuts the plastic away from the model. The unused plastic is left in-place to act as support material for the next layer. (The technology is described in detail at this vendor's web site.)

So it has a quirky mix of additive-build characteristics in the vertical axis (like most 3D printing technologies) and subtractive characteristics in the horizontal axis (like CNC milling). For puzzle making, that opens some exciting opportunities and imposes some severe challenges:

I used the SD300 to build the transparent copies of Minimis 2x2x1 and to build the colored tiles for my Cube 321. Both of those cases fit perfectly with the SD300's unique characteristics.

I've learned to build flexible hinges in the vertical axis, too, but I haven't determined the optimal dimensions yet. Here's a folding puzzle I'm working on, similar to a Yoshimoto Cube. Those two pieces are identical, they're just folded differently. I wasn't sure how thick to make the flexible hinges, so I started with 0.2mm. One of the vertical hinges broke today after two days of testing, so it needs more adjustments.
Attachment:
File comment: Tiny test model of a folding puzzle
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Hollow parts are very difficult. They take longer to build than solid parts because the SD300 has to cut the interior walls and apply masking film to all the interior support material. Worse, the support material tends to stick together (to help ensure precise cutting) so it's really really hard to get the first piece out--like trying to separate two interleaved phone books. The supports are made of the same material as the model, but the entrapped supports have a greater cross section than the model itself--it's all too easy to destroy a hollow model when trying to break away supports from the interior!
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File comment: Removing entrapped supports with pliers
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Certain shapes and geometries have problems with loose ends, like the thin knife-edge shown below. Sometimes I can avoid the problem by changing the design or the build orientation. Sometimes I just have to repair the part and strengthen it with welding solvent.
Attachment:
File comment: Loose edges on slender, tapered edge
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But it is possible to build very thin walls if there aren't any loose ends and you do some additional finishing. The walls on this maze-puzzle container are only 0.7mm thick, but after I dipped it in plastic-welding solvent it's strong enough to withstand ordinary use & abuse.
Attachment:
File comment: Puzzle maze container with 0.7mm thin walls
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The SD300 is especially suitable for building clear tiles of any desired thickness within ± 0.09mm. For a little more effort, the clear tiles can be converted into attractive colored tiles by painting the back side before removing the support material. (The supports act like a perfect mask.) That results in nice glossy tiles.
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File comment: 3D printed, painted tiles
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So the on-topic summary relative to the SD300 would be:
  • It's cheaper than buying a new economy car, but it's hugely more expensive than MakerBot and BFB 3000. (See chart)
  • It's usable for many puzzles, but it may require special planning or finishing steps.
  • The unique technology results in some bonus capabilities that aren't available from commercial 3D printing services; EG: flexible hinges, clear parts, tiles
  • The material is 20 to 100 times cheaper per cc than commercial 3D prints, but the machine uses a lot more material-per-print than commercial services.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:56 pm 
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It looks like a new household printer has just come out in the past couple of weeks; the PP3DP. (Personal Portable 3D Printer) According to the Additive3d comparison chart, the layer thickness is about the same as a Dimension uPrint, and the positioning accuracy does look like it could be just barely good enough for puzzles. Seeing as the company started very recently, there is not much information about the printer yet. The price is $2990, but only $1500 for the first 100 orders. The company is located in China. I am curious to read more information on the printer and see how it compares to other, more expensive commercial printers.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Thu Jul 29, 2010 10:27 pm 
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will_57 wrote:
It looks like a new household printer has just come out in the past couple of weeks; the PP3DP. (Personal Portable 3D Printer) According to the Additive3d comparison chart, the layer thickness is about the same as a Dimension uPrint, and the positioning accuracy does look like it could be just barely good enough for puzzles. Seeing as the company started very recently, there is not much information about the printer yet. The price is $2990, but only $1500 for the first 100 orders. The company is located in China. I am curious to read more information on the printer and see how it compares to other, more expensive commercial printers.


Wow, that looks like, by far, the best 3d printer for the money so far. Very impressive.

ObJet (makers of Polyjet) had a large display at SIGGRAPH, and they had several small 3d printers on display. I wouldn't call them "household" quite yet, but they are compact and impressive nonetheless :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 1:23 am 
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Physically, the PP3DP seems a lot like Makerbot. Apparently the software is a huge advance, and you can download and try the software for free. It doesn't have a separate support material, but the software can add scaffold-like supports to the model which can be cut away afterward with sharp tools.

Another recent development is Mcor Technologies's Matrix printer, which builds models out of ordinary copier paper. It's supposed to be super-cheap to operate.

ZCorp has just announced two new "affordable" 3D printers, but I don't think those will interest puzzle builders. (ZCorp prints are pretty, but not robust or functional.)

The PP3DP is certainly worth watching. In my experience, Chinese laser-cutters and CNC machines offer excellent values for hobbyist users who have the time, patience, and flexibility to fiddle with them.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 6:57 pm 
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I am bumping this topic because I am seriously looking in to saving up to buy a makerbot and I have a few questions.

1. If support material is added would this puzzle serve as at least a decent concept moddeler.
2. Can it really print resolutions of .1mm and how easy is it to do this (Look at their website > records > most detailed).
3. Is the material cost effective in comparison to other services (I.e can someone calculate the cost per cu cm).

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 1:15 am 
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2) The 0.1mm figure is accurate, but that is the positional accuracy. Accuracy of printed parts is far lower.
3) Material cost is very effective. Since you're free to use whatever plastic you want, the cost is virtually nonexistent compared to any commercial printing (The pricing of the material for most commercial machines can be compared to the pricing of inkjet cartridges. Dimension ABS costs $0.30 per CM3. About $0.29 of that is profit to them.)

1) NO, a Makerbot is not and will not be suitable for puzzles soon. This photo says it all.
Even if someone magically came along and added supports (they haven't really been working on that so you can expect to wait a while), quality would not get much better. Quite frankly, a Makerbot is only really good if you want to play around with, hack and tinker with a Makerbot. It's not good if you want to make real stuff with it that requires the accuracy of puzzles.
If making serious puzzles is your game, then let Shapeways take care of the printing. If you'd rather spend your days inhaling ABS fumes and calibrating a Makerbot, then buying one is a good idea.

As of now, letting a Makerbot print unattended isn't really a good idea. So you can't leave it running overnight or while you're away, and printing a single puzzle can take a long time. Not to mention FDM parts (in general) take lots of finishing.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 6:03 pm 
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Tom's observations are accurate, for the reasons he stated. But you asked whether it could "serve as at least a decent concept moddeler" which acknowledges that it might involve some sacrifices. That's a value judgment, depending on what compromises you'd accept.

  • The photo shows a genuinely ugly puzzle, but this photo confirms that it is functional. At least three Makerbot owners have built it successfully, which demonstrates Makerbot could build "concept models" if you don't care about appearance.
  • A Makerbot could build other puzzles if you're willing to adapt the parts by scaling them and chopping them. For instance, Tom's Russian Domino STL files would be buildable (though not pretty) if you divided some of the STLs into two pieces and glued them together afterward. You might have to build it larger to cope with the rough finish.
  • The new Chinese PP3DP addresses the need for supports by generating support scaffolds as part of each model, which the user cuts away afterward with sharp tools. If you're doing your own design, you could certainly include temporary supports as part of your STL.

So, is that the kind of "concept modeler" you had in mind? Would it fit with your hobby, or just pose a continual frustration?


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 10:09 pm 
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I am looking at this as a 6+ months away project as I have to save up the money. All I really want this for is to prove that the puzzles work without having to wait two weeks to recieve something from shapeways. Also, appearance is not that big of a problem because as stated above I only want to know that it works.

I think that these printers will become at least half decent after they upgrade their electronics to gen. 4, add support material and switch to their new extruder which can print layers that are .25mm thick. I will only consider buying it when these conditions are met.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Aug 04, 2010 5:41 pm 
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Sorry for the double post, but I found some very interesting info about the makerbot.

The current layer thickness for a makerbot varries between .3-.5mm. This is because the nozzle width is .5mm wide. I was looking around and found a company that sells extruders for the makerbot with only .25mm wide nozzles (http://www.makergear.com). On their website it says that the .25mm nozzle prints .3mm layers but this can be changed by speeding up the print head bringing it to .25 or less (If you look under the plastruders page you can see that it prints very acurately).

Another problem for makerbots is the smell that comes from the abs plastic. This can be resolved by using pla (Polylactic acid). It is a natural polymer made from the sugars in corn which makes it non-toxic (Somewhat, It is still not recomended for food) and biodegradeable in the body.


Finally, makerbot is constantly upgrading its electronics and print heads to make them more acurate and appealing to the eye. Their latest upgrade is with their v5 print head and the gen 4 electronics which support a seccond or third print head. If anyone wants to look they uploaded pictures of their new hardware in action at siggraph: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mauimakers ... 505498635/

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Last edited by drew11 on Wed Aug 04, 2010 7:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Aug 04, 2010 6:46 pm 
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On pp3dp's web site it say's they are printing models for free as part of a survey.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 10:32 am 
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New (short) article about PP3DP on Make (interesting comments).


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 12:12 pm 
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I know it's not strictly on topic, but my brother told me yesterday that my school has now got a 3d printer (he'd been learning how to use ProDesktop in RM). I'll check it out and see if anyone could give me info (I'm not too confident as my brother described it as 'this thing that can make your thing for you' so I'm not sure if it gives particularly high quality prints). If it's any good, I might print some masters to cast there. :D

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 3:24 pm 
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Whystler, a Thingiverse user, has some interesting comments about the UP! printer here. Be sure to scroll down and read his comments in the discussion section.

He's also posted a detailed report at the Ponoko blog at http://blog.ponoko.com/2010/09/06/user- ... d-printer/

The promoter of UP! has posted a never-assembled bearing at http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3981

Here are some pictures of the bearing, showing the fine detail and support-removal technique.
ImageImage

By all accounts UP! could really change the market.


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 3:44 pm 
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The Up! does look interesting, but these are the main issues I see with it:

1. It only has one extruder, so support material has to be the same material as the model. The support can be broken away, but it can be difficult, if not impossible, on some parts that have support on the inside of the model.

2. The filament size is unusual: 1.73mm, if I remember correctly. This type of filament is more expensive and more difficult to get, so your only option is to buy it from PP3DP.

3. You can only print in ABS, as opposed to on a Makerbot, Rapman, Reprap, BFB 3000, etc where you can print anything that comes in a 3mm filament.

4. They are located in China, so I imagine any customer service issues will be more difficult to resolve, both due to language and location issues.

That being said, for many, these issues are insignificant in comparison to the issues with open-source 3d printers that have a similar price, so it is something to consider for anyone interested in a cheap 3d printer. Considering the price, it is an excellent deal. :)

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 4:03 pm 
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I was wondering ifyou guys could help me out with 3d printers. I'm a college student so I dont have the thousands of dollars to spend on a 3d printer. Does anybody know if there are public 3d printers in existence? Maybe there are places that will allow you to use their's for a fee? I'd really like to know.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 4:06 pm 
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Well, there are many places that will let you use their 3D printer for a fee. Like Shapeways.

[OK, technically they're using the 3D printer for you, but the end result is the same, isn't it?]

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 4:24 pm 
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Perhaps, what monker59 is looking for is a 3d printshop that operates at cost or a substantially-reduced margin. Maybe, this isn't practical on a large scale, but what if the printer were operated by the puzzle community exclusively for the puzzle community? For example, if forum members chipped in (or one generously donated) to purchase a printer, and then sold prints at materials cost to other members? Perhaps, there could be a restriction of one print per member per month, or prints only of puzzles designed by the stl submitter, or... Are there forum members who would take pleasure in operating such a service? Would such a development be good/bad for the puzzle community or 3d printing, because of its "competition" with commercial providers? (Is this too far off-topic?)


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 4:35 pm 
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Shapeways actually has _VERY_ competitive prices (which will keep coming down) and I doubt that a member-provided service could compete with it. It might be somewhat cheaper but very limited in the amount of puzzles that can be produced and extremely time consuming for the member running the printer. It's not just a turn-it-on thing, you also have to clean the pieces, maintain the machine,...

It's a neat idea (I've thought of it previously) but I don't think there's any member out there that would have enough spare time to do this for free. You'd need to be a pensioner (like George Miller, who used to prototype puzzles for others with his Dimension machine) to do something like this. But Shapeways somewhat makes it redundant, since their service is so cheap and accessible.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 5:54 pm 
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I was thinking more like a business that already uses a 3D printer for whatever reason, but it can be used by appointment. The reason why I would prefer to do this over ShapeWays is that if it's local, you can observe and supervise the printing, instead of waiting for it to come via mail.

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 6:26 pm 
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monker59 wrote:
I was thinking more like a business that already uses a 3D printer for whatever reason, but it can be used by appointment. The reason why I would prefer to do this over ShapeWays is that if it's local, you can observe and supervise the printing, instead of waiting for it to come via mail.

We can't make a specific recommendation because you didn't disclose your location, but there are Fab Labs all over the world, many of which offer 3D printing. Look and see if there's one near you.

It might be entertaining to observe the process, but supervising wouldn't really be practical because the machines take a very long time to build most parts. They typically require post-processing time, which makes the wait even longer. For example you can't handle parts built on a V-Flash with your bare hands until they've been 'cured' in a separate UV oven. Most FDM parts have to be washed in caustic soda. ZCorp parts have to be 'infiltrated' with wax, resin, or glue. (But I don't recommend ZCorp printing for puzzles.)


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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 10:54 pm 
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monker59 wrote:
I was thinking more like a business that already uses a 3D printer for whatever reason, but it can be used by appointment.
The TechShop has a 3D printer but there isn't much to see.
And as for operating it yourself I don't think there will be many opportunities. These are very expensive machines that take time to learn to operate and maintain. The last think an owner wants is to let an inexperienced user potentially mess them up. At the TechShop this makes it a bit of an exception, where you submit your jobs and the staff queues up and prints your job.

Dave

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 Post subject: Re: Household 3d Printers
PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2010 11:44 am 
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Well it turns out there's a FabLab at MIT and I'm going to be moving near there pretty soon, so I think I'll try and work with that.

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