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 Post subject: George's Table by OSKAR
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 1:21 pm 
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Hi Non-Twisty Puzzles fans,

George's Table is a large version of the Candy Wrapper puzzle. When George Miller saw the Candy Wrapper, he decided he wanted to have a big bronze version for his house. Using 3D-printing and a metal foundry, he succeeded building two huge puzzle tables, albeit not functional as puzzle. This version is a smaller puzzle table that can be taken apart and put back together again as a puzzle.

Watch the YouTube video.
Buy the puzzle at my Shapeways Shop.
Read more at the Shapeways Forum.
Check out the photos below.

Enjoy!

Oskar
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 Post subject: Re: George's Table by OSKAR
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 3:24 pm 
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Nice looking table... and puzzle...
Oskar wrote:
When George Miller saw the Candy Wrapper, he decided he wanted to have a big bronze version for his house. Using 3D-printing and a metal foundry, he succeeded building two huge puzzle tables, albeit not functional as puzzle.
What!? Who offers 3D printed parts that size? Am I to assume he had molds printed and the foundry cast the parts? If so what were the molds printed in? Were they reusable? I just can't imagine a process for doing this that isn't insanely expensive... and he made TWO? I'd love to know more about the process used.

Carl

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 Post subject: Re: George's Table by OSKAR
PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 3:16 am 
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If I owned a table like that it would certainly have a glass top.

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 Post subject: Re: George's Table by OSKAR
PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 2014 11:32 am 
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wwwmwww wrote:
... What!? Who offers 3D printed parts that size? Am I to assume he had molds printed and the foundry cast the parts? If so what were the molds printed in? Were they reusable? I just can't imagine a process for doing this that isn't insanely expensive... and he made TWO? I'd love to know more about the process used.
George Miller owns his own FDM 3D-printed, a Stratasys Dimension machine. George 3D-printed the bottom half of one table (or at least one third of that) on his machine in blocks, which he glued together. The metal foundry that he used made a type-of silicone mold around that bottom half and removed the 3D-printed original. They pour hot metal (I believe bronze) in the mold, let it cool down for a bit, keep the part upside down so some of the still liquid metal pours out. The result is a half-table that is hollow inside. The foundry repeated the casting process another three times. The two pairs of table halves were welded together, one upside-down onto the other. After that, there was much sanding, polishing and buffing. A metal patina coating was applied to give the table its current looks.

Note that there may be errors in this description, as I am repeating what George heard from the foundry. Neither of us has seen the whole process. You are correct in assuming that the whole process was expensive. The result is gorgeous, as you could see.

Oskar

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 Post subject: Re: George's Table by OSKAR
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 10:38 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2008 2:18 am
Sounds like traditional metal casting, only with the mold being made from a 3D printed master instead of the master being sculpted from something easier to work than the metal. Still, I imagine the 3D printing was a lot less labor intensive than say, carving a master from wood stock or scultping the master from clay.

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